Tutorial 4: Networking with OpenWebif, FTP and SSH

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Tutorial 4: Networking with OpenWebif, FTP and SSH

Post by The Professor » Sun Sep 24, 2017 1:43 am

Tutorial 4: Networking with OpenWebif, FTP and SSH
This tutorial may be distributed freely if you acknowledge tvrosat.com as the source. :grin:

Note: Click on the images below for enlarged view.

___________________________________________________________________
TABLE OF CONTENTS


4.0: Introduction

4.1: Finding Receiver IP and MAC Addresses

4.2: Assigning a new IP Address

4.3: OpenWebif

4.4: FTP with FileZilla

4.5: SSH with Putty

___________________________________________________________________


4.0: Introduction

There will be times when you need to interact with your Linux/Enigma 2 receiver remotely through a network to watch tv, upload files, execute scripts or download EPG information and plugins from the internet. To do these things, you must properly configure the receiver for network activity and learn how to use a few simple networking tools.


4.1: Finding Receiver IP and MAC Addresses


You must first connect your receiver to your network gateway, router or switch with an ordinary ethernet cable. Turn on the machine and let it boot up. If your network identifies the receiver for the first time, it will assign a random local IP address in the form: 192.168.1.xx where xx is a decimal number between 2 - 255. Usually, networks assign xx=1 to your modem gateway (provided by your ISP) and xx=2, xx=3, etc., to your routers, switches and computers connected to your network. In my case, I had 11 devices connected to my network, so the receiver was assigned the first available local IP address: 192.168.1.12

To find the IP address assigned to your receiver, select INFORMATION and NETWORK from the menu.

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The screen below displays the assigned IP address and MAC address of your receiver. Although the IP address can be changed, the MAC address of the receiver is fixed at the factory.

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4.2: Assigning a new IP Address

There will be times when you wish to assign a different IP address to your receiver. For example, if you want to access your receiver from another location (office, work, hotel, etc.), you will need to assign it a permanent IP address and turn it into a server! Ask your ISP for a permanent IP address - most will give you one or two IP addresses for free, while others may charge a small fee. To assign a new IP address to your receiver, you need to access your network gateway (modem) and tell it to do this. You can access your gateway by typing 168.192.1.1 into your browser's URL window. Some gateways will prompt you for a username and password. This information was provided to you by your ISP. If you don't have it, ask them for it.

Once you have access to your gateway, look for the Local Area Network (LAN) Setup page. In my case, it was under the ADVANCED tab. From this page, you can assign any IP address to correspond to any MAC address. In my case, the receiver had a MAC address of 00:17:9A:22:1A:26 which I assigned to another local IP address of 192.168.1.20

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To confirm the IP address change, reboot your receiver and go back to INFORMATION and NETWORK. Voila, the new IP address is now in use!

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Some images like OpenATV allow you to change the IP address from within the receiver menu. In OpenATV, you would go to SETUP > SYSTEM > NETWORK > DEVICE SETUP.

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Select Adapter Settings. Change Use DHCP to no. Scroll down to IP address and change it to the address you want. Press OK on your remote to save the new settings.

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4.3: OpenWebif


OpenWebif is an extremely useful plugin that is found pre-installed in practically all Enigma 2 images. In the unlikely event that it wasn't installed on your receiver, you should review the tutorial on plugins to learn how to install it.

To access OpenWebif, open your internet browser and enter your receiver's assigned IP address in the browser's URL window and hit return. If you don't know your receiver's IP address, your network gateway or router probably assigned something like the following:

192.168.1.2
192.168.1.3
192.168.1.4
.
.
.
.
192.168.254

Try testing some of these IP addresses until you hit the right one and the OpenWebif page pops up like the one below. On the left side of OpenWebif you will see all the menus that allow you to interact with your receiver. In the REMOTE menu, click on the diagonal arrows (above the number 3) to bring up the remote.

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With the remote accessible on the left, you can start using your receiver and doing everything you would with the real remote, including watching TV!

A very useful tool of OpenWebif is grab screenshot. You can use this tool to take a 'snap shot' of the menu screens or the video on the screen. In fact, all the screen shots for this tutorial were generated in this manner. If you right click on the image, you can save it. Many satellite enthusiasts like to grab screenshots of new feeds they have found and upload them to our forum.

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Another useful menu is SETTINGS. From here, you can configure practically everything in your receiver!

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Finally, BOUQEUT EDITOR lets you quickly edit channels and make changes to your guide. We will go into this topic in more detail in another tutorial, but it should be obvious that if your receiver is network accessible, you can always make quick channel edits on your desktop PC without the need for having physical access to it. You can even make changes from a remote interconnect location, while someone else is watching TV at home. If you are really creative, you can even setup a script on a remote server to add/delete new channels on the fly and download epg information too!

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4.4: FTP with FileZilla


Occasionally, you will need to upload/download a file to your receiver just like you would to a server. To do this, you will need an FTP software tool like FileZilla. This tool is free and can be downloaded from this site

https://filezilla-project.org/download.php?type=client


After you install it on your desktop, go to File > Open > Site Manager. At the prompt, enter the IP address of your receiver in the host box and for User enter root as shown below.

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If you were successful, you will see a screen like the one below. On the right, you will see the Linux directories found on your receiver. On the left, you will see the Windows directories found on your PC. You can browse both directories and upload/download files from here.

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4.5: SSH with Putty


The last thing we will cover in this tutorial is a simple tool you need to issue Linux commands to your receiver. If you plan to write and execute your own code on your receiver, or even develop your own Enigma 2 images, you will need to interact with the Linux operating system at the command level.

You can download Putty from here

http://www.putty.org/

Open the program and enter your receiver's IP address in the Host Name box. Select Port 22 and SSH. Click OPEN.
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Once connected, you will see the prompt screen below. Login as root. You can now start interacting with the Linux Operating system on your machine. For example, I issued the command pwd (present working directory) and Linux responded with /home/root

Linux commands are mostly based on the older Unix system developed by Bell Labs in the 1970s and later copied by the universities and industry. Today, a version of Unix sits in your machine ready to exploit the satellite hardware in your receiver. We will cover some of the basic Linux commands in a future tutorial, but if you plan to become a full fledged programmer and do your own firmware development, you will need to purchase a Linux/Unix reference book and learn how to code on a PC with Linux installed.

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Re: Tutorial 4: Networking with OpenWebif, FTP and SSH

Post by The Professor » Mon Mar 19, 2018 11:18 pm

...
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